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For example, during initialization the monitor driver queries the Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM) driver for its brightness query interface and device driver interface (DDI) support, which is in the EDID. Incorrect or invalid EDID info on the monitor’s EEPROM can therefore lead to problems such as setting incorrect display modes. Acer has rolled out the drivers for its TravelMate P248-M and P248-MG notebook models compatible with the 64-bit version of Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system, which should provide improved performance and usability.

With an INF file you can override the Extended Display Identification Data (EDID) of any monitor. A sample INF file, Monsamp.inf, that shows how to do this was provided with the Windows Driver Kit (WDK) through Windows 7 (WDK version 7600). Monsamp.inf is reproduced here.

For info on how to use and modify Monsamp.inf, see Monitor INF File Sections.

Approaches to correcting EDIDs

All monitors, analog or digital, must support EDID, which contains info such as the monitor identifier, manufacturer data, hardware identifier, timing info, and so on. This data is stored in the monitor’s EEPROM in a format that is specified by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA).

Monitors provide the EDID to Microsoft Windows components, display drivers, and some user-mode applications. For example, during initialization the monitor driver queries the Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM) driver for its brightness query interface and device driver interface (DDI) support, which is in the EDID. Incorrect or invalid EDID info on the monitor’s EEPROM can therefore lead to problems such as setting incorrect display modes.

There are two approaches to correcting EDIDs:

  • The standard solution is to have the customer send the monitor back to the manufacturer, who reflashes the EEPROM with the correct EDID and returns the monitor to the customer.
  • A better solution, described here, is for the manufacturer to implement an INF file that contains the correct EDID info, and have the customer download it to the computer that's connected to the monitor. Windows extracts the updated EDID info from the INF and provides it to components instead of the info from the EEPROM EDID, effectively overriding the EEPROM EDID.

In addition to replacing the EDID info as described here, a vendor can provide an override for the monitor name and the preferred display resolution. Such an override is frequently made available to customers through Windows Update or digital media in the shipping box. Such an override receives higher precedence than the EDID override mentioned here. Guidelines for achieving this can be found in Monitor INF File Sections.

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EDID format

EDID data is formatted as one or more 128-byte blocks:

  • EDID version 1.0 through 1.2 consists of a single block of data, per the VESA specification.
  • With EDID version 1.3 or enhanced EDID (E-EDID), manufacturers can specify one or more extension blocks in addition to the primary block.
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Each block is numbered, starting with 0 for the initial block. To update EDID info, the manufacturer’s INF specifies the number of the block to be updated and provides 128 bytes of EDID data to replace the original block. The monitor driver obtains the updated data for the corrected blocks from the registry and uses the EEPROM data for the remaining blocks.

Updating an EDID

To update an EDID by using an INF:

Free
  1. The monitor manufacturer implements an INF that contains the updated EDID info and downloads the file to the user’s computer. This can be done through Windows Update or by shipping a CD with the monitor.

  2. The monitor class installer extracts the updated EDID info from the INF and stores the info as values under this registry key:

    Each EDID override is stored under a separate key. For example:

  3. The monitor driver checks the registry during initialization and uses any EDID info that's stored there instead of the corresponding info on EEPROM. EDID info that has been added to the registry always takes precedence over EEPROM EDID info.

  4. Windows components and user-mode apps use the updated EDID info.

Overriding an EDID with an INF

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To override an EDID, include an AddReg directive in the INF for each block that you want to override, in the following format:

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The block number is a zero-indexed value of the EDID block to override. The data bytes should be formatted as 128 hexadecimal integers that contain the binary EDID data. The '0x1' value after the block number is a flag indicating that this registry value contains binary data (FLG_ADDREG_BINVALUETYPE).

Manufacturers must update only those EDID blocks that are incorrect. The system obtains the remaining blocks from EEPROM. The following example shows the relevant sections of an INF that updates EDID blocks 0, 4, and 5. The monitor driver obtains blocks 1 - 3 and any extension blocks that follow block 5 from EEPROM:

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For more info on INFs in general, and AddReg and DDInstall in particular, see Creating an INF File.

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CmosPwd works and compiles under Dos-Win9x, Windows NT/W2K/XP/2003, Linux, FreeBSD and NetBSD.
Typical Usage for DOS and all Windows users:
1) Identify your BIOS manufacturer (usually displayed at boot-up)
2) Start in DOS, or start a DOS session in Windows 95/98/ME. For Windows NT or Windows 2000 boot from a DOS or Windows 95/98 boot disk (you can find boot disks at www.AnswersThatWork.com), and run CMOSPWD from your boot floppy (or another floppy).
3) C: [Enter] cd CMOSPWD [Enter]
4) Type CMOSPWD at the DOS prompt and press Enter.
5) CMOSPWD will display a list of possibilities. Use the possibilities itemised against your BIOS manufacturer. Remember :
a) For AWARD BIOSes, use the Numeric Keypad (with NumLock ON).
b) AWARD 4.50PG BIOS always accepts 'AWARD_SW', or 'd8on', or '589589'.
c) Old Phoenix BIOSes will accept 'phoenix'.
6) If the standard method does not work, then try to kill the CMOS password with CMOSPWD /K (and press Enter), and then see if you can get into the CMOS without a password. If you can, you successfully 'killed' the old CMOS password. DO NOT KILL THE CMOS ON LAPTOPS!
On laptops, the password is usually stored in an eeprom on the motherboard,
you need an eeprom programmer (electronic device) to retrieve it.
Works with the following BIOSes
- ACER/IBM BIOS
- AMI BIOS
- AMI WinBIOS 2.5
- Award 4.5x/4.6x/6.0
- Compaq (1992)
- Compaq (New version)
- IBM (PS/2, Activa, Thinkpad)
- Packard Bell
- Phoenix 1.00.09.AC0 (1994), a486 1.03, 1.04, 1.10 A03, 4.05 rev 1.02.943, 4.06 rev 1.13.1107
- Phoenix 4 release 6 (User)
- Gateway Solo - Phoenix 4.0 release 6
- Toshiba
- Zenith AMI
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